"The same can be said for the work of sound designer Emily Duncan Wilson (who also contributes the ideal music in the play): the sound in “The Plot” is crystal clear and it almost seems that the play is actually taking place outside, what with the noise of insects and other creatures and one scene where the rain sounds like it is coming down torrentially."

             -Zander Opper

"Through Eno's language, as expressed in particular by Righty and Grey, and enhanced by the elaborate but precarious landscape created by scenic designer Sarah Karl, the detailed sound design by Emily Duncan Wilson (who also contributed the original music) and a pitch perfect lighting design by Evan C. Anderson, a feeling for the value of the property is created, whether on a bright sunny morning or in the midst of a windy, thunder clapping middle of the night downpour."

          -Andrew Beck, BroadwayWorld.com

"It’s a staged performance piece in which movement and gesture interact with lighting by Nicole E. Lang and live sound—featuring a looper, a clarinet, and a two-string violin—by Emily Duncan Wilson. The tone, neither heavy nor light, provokes contemplation, as Benne and Kim enact living tableaux that take us on a journey—a body odyssey or bodyssey—from the beginning of life on earth to something quite cosmic. [...]

 

The artistry of the piece is a matter of the way all three—Benne, Kim, Wilson—work together, reacting and responding to each other, and provoking in the viewer responses that can be very individual and yet part of the overall experience."

             -Donald Brown, New Haven Review

"It's Grey who identifies a warbling bird as a chickadee, among many other outdoor sounds. Emily Duncan Wilson's sound design and original music create a deceptively realistic alignment with nature. Lighting designer Evan C. Anderson's moody sunrises and sunsets play over Sarah Karl's wonderful set with its decaying gazebo."

           -Curtain Up

"The design for “The Plot” is fantastic. Sarah Karl’s scenic design of the small cemetery with the busted up shed and gazebo is richly detailed. Ornamented by Emily Duncan Wilson’s sound design and Evan C. Anderson’s lighting, the environment of “The Plot” feels fully realized and lived in. There is a brilliantly executed nightmare scene that had the theater rumbling with thunder and lighting; it was striking and gasp-inducing. The only thing missing was real salamanders roaming the stage."

             -Tim Leininger, CT Examiner